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Psoriasis

 

Psoriasis is a chronic, autoimmune disease that appears on the skin. It occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis is not contagious.

There are five types of psoriasis. The most common form, plaque psoriasis, appears as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells. Psoriasis can occur on any part of the body and is associated with other serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and depression.

Psoriasis is the most common autoimmune disease in the U.S and it effects as many as 7.5 million Americans… 125 million people worldwide!

For more in depth information about Psoriasis, check out the National Psoriasis Foundation website

Types of Psoriasis

Psoriasis appears in a variety of forms with distinct characteristics. Typically, an individual has only one type of psoriasis at a time. Generally, one type of psoriasis will clear and another form of psoriasis will appear in response to a trigger.

 

Plaque Psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris)

Plaque psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris) is the most prevalent form of the disease. About 80 percent of those who have psoriasis have this type. It is characterized by raised, inflamed, red lesions covered by a silvery white scale. It is typically found on the elbows, knees, scalp and lower back.

 

Guttate

Guttate [GUH-tate] psoriasis is a form of psoriasis that often starts in childhood or young adulthood. The word guttate is from the Latin word meaning “drop.” This form of psoriasis appears as small, red, individual spots on the skin. Guttate lesions usually appear on the trunk and limbs. These spots are not usually as thick as plaque lesions.

Guttate psoriasis often comes on quite suddenly. A variety of conditions can bring on an attack of guttate psoriasis, including upper respiratory infections, streptococcal throat infections (strep throat), tonsillitis, stress, injury to the skin and the administration of certain drugs including antimalarials and beta-blockers.

 

Inverse

Inverse psoriasis is found in the armpits, groin, under the breasts, and in other skin folds around the genitals and the buttocks. This type of psoriasis appears as bright-red lesions that are smooth and shiny. Inverse psoriasis is subject to irritation from rubbing and sweating because of its location in skin folds and tender areas. It can be more troublesome in overweight people and those with deep skin folds.

 

Pustular

Primarily seen in adults, pustular psoriasis is characterized by white blisters of noninfectious pus (consisting of white blood cells) surrounded by red skin. With in the category of Postualr Psoriasis there are three sub categories of pustular psoriasis.

Pustular psoriasis may be localized to certain areas of the body, such as the hands and feet, or covering most of the body. It begins with the reddening of the skin followed by formation of pustules and scaling.

Pustular psoriasis may be triggered by internal medications, irritating topical agents, overexposure to UV light, pregnancy, systemic steroids, infections, stress and sudden withdrawal of systemic medications or potent topical steroids.

 

This website is NOT designed to diagnose or assist in diagosing a disease but rather to help the general public become educated about common skin diseases. Consult a physician for further information.

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